Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Electrochemistry Berlin, Germany.

Day 2 :

ElectroChemistry 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sefik Suzer photo
Biography:

Sefik Suzer has completed his PhD in 1976 from the University of California, Berkeley, USA. After postdoctoral studies at Sydney (Australia) and Freiburg (Germany) Universities, he joined Middle East Technical University in Turkey in 1979 till he moved to Bilkent University in 1992. He has been serving as Editorial Board Memeber of Journal of Electron Spectroscopy, Applied Surface Scince, Spectroscopy and Dynamics, and as an Editor of Surface Scince Reports, and he is s Fellow of the American Vacuum Scince since 2010.

Abstract:

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a chemical analysis tool, is utilized for investigation of charge screening across metal electrodes fabricated on a porous polymer surface which is infused with an ionic liquid (IL). The IL provides a sheet of conducting layer to the otherwise insulating polymer film, and enables monitoring charging and screening dynamics at the polymer + IL / air interface in a laterally resolved fashion across the electrodes. Time-resolved measurements are also implemented by recording several peaks of the IL, while imposing 10-3 to 10+3 Hz square-wave-pulses (SQW) across the electrodes in a source-drain geometry. Variations in the binding energy of the measured peaks (Au4f, C1s, N1s and F1s) reflects directly the local electrical potential, and allow us visualize screening of the otherwise built-in local voltage drop on and across the electrodes. Accordingly, the device is partitioned into two oppositely polarized regions, each following the polarization of one electrode through the IL medium. Impact of our findings with the presented structure and variants XPS measurements on understanding of various electrochemical concepts will be discussed. 

  • Batteries and energy sources | Organic and Organometallic Electrochemistry | Corrosion Science and Technology | Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry | Applications of Electrochemistry | Electroplating & Coatings | Organic and Bioelectrochemistry | Electrochemical Engineering | Carbon Nanostructures and Devices | Potentiostat Electrochemistry | Electrochemical Methods of Analysis
Location: Berlin, Germany
Speaker
Biography:

Dong Junhua is a professor working in Institute of Metal Research (IMR), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). He has his expertise in electrochemical corrosion principle of metals in study and teaching. His primary research aim is to solve various industrial and natural environmental corrosion problems. His research interests has been focused on: the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion evolution of low alloy steels; the study of developing cost effective weathering steel and marine corrosion resistant steel; the design of waste containers for the underground geological disposal of high level nuclear wastes in China; the study of marine corrosion in tidal zone and deep sea; the evaluation of concrete corrosion; the study of magnesium corrosion and protection by alloying and coating technique; the evaluation of corrosion inhibitors; electrochemical corrosion monitoring for various corrosion environments. He has taught the course of electrochemical corrosion principle of metals to the graduate students for 14 years in his organization. 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Low carbon steel with the microstructures of ferrite and pearlite phases is the most widely used engineering structure material, in which pearlite with a typical lamellar structure consisting of alternating layers of ferrite and cementite (Fe3C) plays an important role in the mechanical properties of steel. However, as the electrically contact of Fe3C as a cathode site and ferrite site as anode in electrolyte can cause the galvanic corrosion, the corrosion resistance of steels will be rapidly deteriorated. The purpose of this study is to describe the sustained effect of the remaining cementite on enhancing the corrosion deterioration and the effect of several added alloy elements on retarding the corrosion of low carbon steel in an acid solution. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Immersion test, X-ray diffraction, micromorphology observation, potentio-dynamic polarization, open circuit potential monitoring and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was utilized in this study. Findings: The results show that, with extending the immersion time, the preferential dissolution of the exposed ferrite resulted in a lot of cementite accumulation on the steel surface, which enhanced the galvanic effect and hence accelerated the corrosion. The promoted anodic dissolution of ferrite phases was controlled by charge transfer process, while the hydrogen evolution reduction occurred on cementite was controlled by the diffusion process. For 16MnCu steel, elemental Cu precipitated as the nano-sized particles on the steel surface, which improved the corrosion resistance of the steel by weakening the galvanic effect between the ferrite and cementite sites. Moreover, trace of alloy elements of Sn or Sn-Mo could improve the corrosion resistance of AH32 steel, which is also ascribed to that Sn or Sn-Mo could retard the galvanic corrosion between the ferrite and cementite phases. Sn and Mo should exist as the metallic state and were uniformly distributed on the steel surface. 

Speaker
Biography:

Andrés G. Muñoz is a senior scientist passionate about fundamental questions of electroplating of semiconductors and metals. He has gained his expertise by working with renowned scientists from the German electrochemistry school at the Heinrich-Heine University of Düsseldorf and the Research Centre Jülich. After being distinguished with an Alexander von Humboldt fellowship, he succeeded in combining his wide background in electrochemistry with surface science on joining the Institute for Solar Fuels and Energy Storage Materials at the Helmholtz-Center in Berlin. He resolved fundamental questions of interfacial photoelectrochemical processes in solar energy conversion systems. Presently, his is also involved in projects concerning the application of electrodeposition to improve the corrosion 

Abstract:

Solar water splitting tandem devices are a promising route for building a carbon-neutral energy infrastructure based on hydrogen as a fuel. The development horizon suggests the use of technologically advanced semiconductor materials, mainly III-V ones, due to its fast technical realization. The coupling of high-efficiency photovoltaics with electrochemical water splitting processes (two in one systems) requires from smart conditioning methods to turn semiconductor surfaces electrochemical active (figure 1). Particularly, the decoration of with noble metals, such as Pt and Rh is one of the most pursued approaches in the design of photocathodes to be integrated in tandem-type devices. Electroplating is preferred method due to its simplicity, its low cost and its power for accessing hidden places in complicated geometrical shapes (structured surfaces with enhanced photonic properties). The optical and electrocatalytic performance of deposited metal films can be enhanced by achieving a particular size and distribution of their nano-dimensioned grains. The chemical composition of the electrolytic bath, the applied potential program and illumination intensity constitute the main tools to do this. Electroplating of noble metals, however, triggers interfacial reactions generating chemical and electronic surface transformations. This is due to the complex multi-electron transfer involved in the metal phase formation and the particular high thermodynamic redox potential. Therefore, the selection of a galvanic method must balance coupled interfacial processes with desired properties of the electrocatalytic film. The complex picture of electrocrystallization of Rh will be discussed in the light of experiments performed on silicon, InP and GaInP. These systems are characterized by the formation of an interfacial oxide film separating electrocatalytic particles from the absorbing semiconductor. The composition and electronic structure of this latter builds a particular energetic pathway chart that defines the electrode performance. 

Speaker
Biography:

Marie-Christine Record has completed her PhD in 1992 from Montpellier University (France) and postdoctoral studies from Ecole Centrale Paris (France). She was an associate professor at Montpellier University from 1996 to 2004 and from 2004, she is full professor at the Aix-Marseille University (France) where she works on the elaboration of thin films materials for energy. She has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute

Abstract:

Electrochemical deposition may provide an alternative process to physical deposition methods for peparing semiconducting thin films. Indeed by contrast to other methods, electrochemical deposition is a low cost, room temperature production technique, which works without vacuum atmosphere and allows one to cover substrates with complex shapes. The shortcoming of electrochemical deposition is limited control on the size, stoichiometry and crystallinity of deposits.The electrochemical atomic layer deposition (EC-ALD) method was put forward in 1991 by Gregory and Stickney. This method is based on the alternate underpotential deposition (UPD) of atomic layers of the elements to make up a compound, combining advantageously the technique of electrochemical deposition and that of atomic layer deposition (ALD). Underpotential deposition is a surface-limited electrochemical phenomenon, which makes the deposition generally limited to an atomic layer. In every cycle one monolayer of the compound is obtained, and the thickness of the deposit will only depend on the number of cycles. Each cycle consists in a series of individual steps, and each step can be optimized independently, resulting in well-controlled deposits. In the first part of this talk, I will describe the EC-ALD method and I will expose the advantages of this method compared to those of physical ones of ALD type and compared to those of other electrochemical methods. Then, I will detail the EC-ALD experiment platform designed and constructed in our group. Finally, I will present some results we got with this equipment for the electrodeposition of CoSb3 and Sb2Se3 compounds. 

Speaker
Biography:

Oliver Clemens has obtained his PhD in 2012 years from Saarland University, Germany, followed by postdoctoral studies at the University of Birmingham, UK. He is group leader of the Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials, TU Darmstadt and KIT, Germany since May 2013. At the beginning of 2017 he became a junior professor (Qualifikationsprofessor) within the Materials Science Department at the TU Darmstadt, Germany within an Emmy Noether Fellowship from the German Research Foundation. He has published more than 36 papers (November 2016) in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Building batteries based on a shuttle of fluoride ions is of interest due to the high stability of fluoride as a charge carrier. Therefore, wide potential windows can be accessible in such battery systems allowing for high energy densities. So far, fluoride ion batteries (FIBs) are mainly fabricated as all solid state batteries using conversion based electrodes. However, conversion reactions are well-known to result in limited battery lifetime due to the large volume changes which arise during the cycling of the battery. In addition, high overpotentials (crystallization, charge transfer) can have a tremendous impact on battery kinetics. To improve battery kinetics, we aim to develop intercalation based fluoride ion batteries with high capacities and high voltage. In this respect, perovskite and perovskite related compounds (e. g. Ruddlesdon-Popper type structures) will be shown to serve as host lattices which can intercalate/deintercalate large amounts of fluoride ions, with theoretical capacities reaching ~ 130 mAh/g and being comparable to lithium ion battery systems. We highlight that such materials can outperform CuF2 as a high voltage cathode in agreement with by DFT based calculations. Latest developments on the identification of suitable anode materials will be described in addition to an overview of current limitations of anion based battery systems. Finallly, we will elucidate structure chemical factors which enable selectivity for the intercalating species for cation (e. g. Li and Na) in comparison to anion based batteries.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Xiangyu Zhao has his expertise in electrochemical energy storage including electrochemical hydrogen storage and rechargeable batteries such as chloride ion batteries, lithium ion batteries and magnesium batteries. He received his PhD in Materials Science at the Nanjing Tech University in 2010 and then joined the same university. Meanwhile, from 1/2012 to 12/2013, he was awarded by the Guest Scientist Fellowship and worked at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. He is (co-)author of 9 patent applications and has more than 60 papers published in international journals such as Angew Chem Int Ed, Adv Energy Mater and Energy Environ Sci.

Abstract:

Alternative battery chemistries beyond lithium ion and using abundant electrode materials have been developed. Chloride ion battery (CIB) is a new rechargeable battery based on Cl- anion transfer. This battery shows a variety of electrochemical couples with theoretical energy densities up to 2500 Wh l-1, which is superior to those of conventional lithium ion batteries. Abundant material resources such as Mg, Ca, Na and metal chlorides (e.g., FeCl3, CuCl2 and MgCl2) can be sustainable electrode candidates. The CIB includes a metal chloride/metal electrochemical couple and an ionic liquid electrolyte allowing chloride ion transfer, as reported in the proof-of-principle study of CIB operated at room temperature. The problem is that the metal chloride cathode can react with chloride ions in the electrolyte, leading to the formation of soluble complex anion. This electrode dissolution and the subsequent shuttle would limit the use of metal chloride cathode in the liquid electrolyte system. Metal oxychlorides with higher stability have been proved to be new cathode materials for CIBs. Metal oxychloride/metal systems could also show high theoretical energy densities during the chloride ion transfer. By carbon incorporation in the cathode or optimization of electrolyte composition, more than 70% of the theoretical discharge capacity of single-electron cathode such as FeOCl or VOCl could be delivered. A preliminary study on the multi-electron VOCl2 cathode was also reported in the electrode system using VOCl as cathode and Mg/MgCl2 composite as anode. Besides inorganic electrode materials in rechargeable batteries, organic electrode materials, in particular polymers, have been attracting much attention, due to their advantages of good electrochemical performance, high stability, abundant chemical elements, structural tunability and designing flexibility. Chloride ion doped polymer materilals have been studied and developed as new cathodes for chloride ion batteries. Reversible reversible redox reactions and superior cycling stability were obtained

Speaker
Biography:

Benoît Ter-Ovanessian has been named associate professor in the Material Science and Engineering Department at INSA de Lyon in France in 2013. He has joined the Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering group of the MATEIS laboratory and integrated the research project of the CNRS International Associated Laboratory, ELyT Lab, which promotes collaborations between Lyon University (Fr) and Tohoku University (Jp). His research activities are mainly focused on the understanding of the passivation features, the interactions between mechanical loading and interfacial reactivity; and consequently the managing of the reliability of metallic components.

Abstract:

Semi-conductive properties of passive film represent discriminant parameters in many applications in photo-electrochemistry such as photoanodes or photoelectrochemical cells, or in electrochemistry such as sensors, bio-electrochemical cells and corrosion. For this reason, the accurate determination of these properties is of great interest. Considering passive films as thin highly disordered semiconductor, the electronic properties of passive films are generally investigated by photo-electrochemistry or differential capacitance measurement of the Mott-Schottky (MS) theory. In the MS approach, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a widely used technique to determine the capacitance of the passive film. However, different limitations are known to alter the final results. For example, the electronic properties obtained by conventional MS experiments are known to be frequency dependent. Furthermore, as Constant-Phase-Element (CPE) behavior is commonly observed on the impedance diagrams recorded with passive materials, the method to extract the effective capacitance from the high frequency time-constant dispersions has to be carefully chosen.

In the present work, the recent advances in experimental procedure and interpretations of EIS spectra during MS experiments, which allow to accurately determine the electronics properties of passive film, are described for passive films grown on pure Chromium and Nickel-Chromium alloys. The relevance of multi-frequency MS experiments that limits the frequency dependency of the capacitance measurements is firstly discussed. Secondly, the pertinence of the power-law model or the Cole-Cole representation of the complex capacitance to assess the passive film capacitance from EIS diagrams during MS experiments is then debated for different systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Yu-Wu Zhong obtained his Ph.D. in July 2004 from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) under the supervision of Prof. Guo-Qiang Lin. From September 2004 to September 2006, he has been a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Tokyo with Prof. Eiichi Nakamura. From October 2006 to September 2009, he worked with Prof Hector D. Abruna at Cornell University as a postdoctoral researcher. In October 2009, he was awarded by the “100 talent” program of CAS and joined Key Laboratory of Photochemistry of the Institute of Chemistry, CAS, to start his independent career. His research interests focus on electro-active and photofunctional organic materials and transition-metal complexes. He has published more that 110 peer-reviewed papers to date. He is currently an associate editor of RSC Advances and editorial board member of Scientific Reports and Science China Chemistry.

Abstract:

Electro-active and electrochromic materials have received a wide range of applications. The incorporation of a metal ion gives rise to new functions that are not present in common organic materials. However, the applications of electro-active organometallic materials are often hampered by their high redox potentials and difficulty in film formation. Recently, we have been interested in the design and construction of electro-active systems with cyclometalated ruthenium and triarylamine as the charge-bearing sites. These materials show strong electronic coupling and multiple reversible redox processes in low positive potential window. After modified with vinyl or triphenyl units, these can be smoothly deposited onto ITO electrode surfaces by in situ electropolymerization. The obtained films exhibit multistate NIR electrochromism with long retention time, good contrast ratio, and low switching potential. The response is about a few seconds. Depending on the number of redox sites, 3 - 5 step redox switching were realized. These films have been used for the demonstrations of flip-flop or flip-flap-flop memory with electrochemical potentials as input signals and absorbance at different wavelengths as output signals. In addition to electropolymerized films, self-assembled monolayer films of these complexes were obtained and they are useful in molecular-scale NIR electrochromism and electrochemically-gated single molecular conductance.

Speaker
Biography:

Taner Yonar was born in 1974 Turkey. He has a B.Sc. (1996) degree in Environmental Engineering, Uludag University, a M.Sc. (1999) degree in Environmental Science, Uludag University, Institute of Sciences. He has completed his PhD (2005) in Environmental Technology, at Uludag University, Institute of Sciences, where he also worked a research assistant in 1997-2007. He did his post-doctoral research in UK, at Newcastle University, Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials Department (2011). He is currently working as an Associate Professor at the Environmental Engineering Department of Uludag University.

Abstract:

The application of Sn-Sb-Ni electrodes for the treatment of waste streams is too limited in literature. Sn/SbNi-Ti anodes are tested for electrochemical ozone generation. Sn/Sb/Ni-Ti anodes are promising alloys for ozone production by electrolysis of water because of their stability and over potential for the oxygen evolution reaction.  These series of anodes have high electrochemical ozone generation potential at ambient conditions (apprioximately 40% current efficiency). Dairy plant wastewaters are generally high-strength wastes containing soluble, colloidal, and suspended solids at high concentrations, with several sources of chemical and biochemical oxygen demand, but mainly of organic origin.  Serious environmental problems can arise if dairy wastewater is not treated properly.  According to our knowledge, electrochemical treatment of dairy effluent using Sn/Sb/Ni-Ti anodes is missing in literature. In this study, titanium mesh substrate coated with Sn-Sb-Ni alloy was used as anode immersed in wastewater at room temperature with platinised titanium cathode. Five operational parameters ( initial dye concentration, pH, COD, applied voltage/current and the contact time) were evaluated for the electrochemical degradation of dairy 

Speaker
Biography:

Elise Deunf received her PhD in physical and analytical chemistry in 2010 under Dr Christian Amatore from the Ecole Normale Supérieure (Paris). She then joined the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California Berkeley as a postdoctoral fellow to develop new organic hydrogen carriers for PEM-fuel cells in collaboration with GE Global research. In 2013, she moved back to France to work with Prof. Philippe Poizot at the Institute of Materials Jean Rouxel (Nantes). Her current research focuses on molecular electrochemistry and the development of organic electrode materials for alternative and low-polluting batteries. 

Abstract:

Routine access to power sources is an essential factor for developing our technology-oriented society and ensuring a better quality of life. In this context, while the implementation of renewable energy sources is in progress, electrical energy storage (EES) systems are set to play a central and potentially critical role in the next-generation energy infrastructure. Faced with a worldwide demand for powering electrified vehicles and electronic devices of all kinds, accelerated progress and innovation in the development of new and potentially “greener” electrochemical storage solutions are thus imperative. Based on the tailoring of naturally abundant chemical elements (C, H, N, O, S, in particular), organic chemistry provides great opportunities for finding innovative electrode materials able to operate in aqueous or nonaqueous electrolytes.1 Along this line, significant progress has been achieved these last ten years on redox-active organic compounds, bringing them to the attention of the energy storage community. Indeed, organic chemistry provides great opportunities for discovering innovative electrode materials able to operate both in aqueous and nonaqueous electrolytes. Additionally, it must be pointed out that two types of electrochemical insertion mechanisms can be used in practice with either reversible uptake/release of cations or anions (figure 1a, 1b respectively).In this communication, we will present recent advances on organic host materials and will particularly report on small organic compounds based on aromatic core structures that are functionalized by redox-active groups such as enolate and amine, and which able to reversibly host cations or anions by electrochemical reaction.3-6

Speaker
Biography:

Huriye İcil was borned in Larnaca, Cyprus, in 1960. She received her Ph.D in Organic Chemistry from Ege University of Turkey, in 1993. In 1993, 1995 and 2002 she was appointed as Assist. Professor, Assoc. Professor and full Professor, respectively at Eastern Mediterranean Univ. (North-Cyprus). She directed many research projects funded by NATO, DFG, DAAD, CNRS, TUBITAK and DPT. She held Visiting Scientists positions at Max Planck Institute (Mulheim), Rochester Univ., and East Anglia Univ. She has 32 published articles in reputed journals. She graduated 33 MSc and 9 PhD students. Her research interests focus on design and synthesis of novel organic materials with remarkable electrical and optical properties.

Abstract:

Development of novel materials with optimal structural, thermal, photochemical and electrochemical properties plays an important role in the researches for a sustainable energy future. Perylene dyes are particularly important compounds due to their remarkable absorption and emission in the spectral region from visible to near infrared (NIR), photochemical and electrochemical properties, and thermal, chemical and photochemical stabilities. They are indeed very promising electron acceptors for efficient organic photovoltaics (OPV). Undoubtedly, photovoltaic applicability of perylene dyes mainly based electrochemical properties. In general, perylene dyes show two different reversible and electrochemically stable reduction peaks in solution state. The first reduction involves the conversion of the neutral compound to the relevant radical anion and the second one accounts for the further reduction to dianion. The separation between the potentials at which the two charge transfers take place allows one to discard the occurrence of any redox reaction between the dianion and the neutral compound. Interestingly the electrochemical characteristics of perylene dyes are completely different in solutions and solid state.  They show only one broad and reversible reduction peak in solid state. Further, the analysis of the voltammetric signals suggested that two anodic and cathodic peak systems were actually overlapped. Planarity of the structure, introducing electron donor and acceptor substituents at the imide or bay positions or different intermolecular interactions caused different electrochemical properties. In this study, a detailed comparative study on the electrochemical properties of N-substituted or bay substituted perylene diimides, donor-acceptor-donor structured perylene diimides, self-assembled microstructure perylene diimides and perylene polymers,  has been carried out. For comparison, the HOMO-LUMO energy differences for the selected perylene dyes were determined using both electrochemical and optical methods. Notably, the HOMO energy values obtained through the electrochemical and optical band gaps are quite different.