Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Electrochemistry Berlin, Germany.

Day 1 :

ElectroChemistry 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Evgeny Katz photo
Biography:

Evgeny Katz received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry (Moscow) in 1983. He was a senior researcher at the Institute of Photosynthesis (Pushchino), Russian Academy of Sciences (1983-1991), a Humboldt fellow at the Technische Universität München (Germany) (1992-1993), and a research associate professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1993-2006). Since 2006 he is Milton Kerker Chaired Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, NY (USA). He has (co)authored over 400 papers in the areas of biocomputing, bioelectronics, biosensors and biofuel cells. Thomson Reuters included him in the list of the world’s top 100 chemists over the past 10 years as ranked by the impact of their published research. Professor Katz was also included in the list of top cited chemists prepared by the Royal Society of Chemistry with the worldwide rank 378 based on his Hirsch-index, which is currently 81.

Abstract:

Implantable devices harvesting energy from biological sources and based on electrochemical transducers are currently receiving high attention. The energy collected from the body can be utilized to activate various microelectronic devices. This talk is an overview of the recent research activity in the area of enzyme-based biofuel cells implanted in biological tissue and operating in vivo. The electrical power extracted from the biological sources presents use for activating microelectronic devices for biomedical applications. While some microelectronic devices can work within a fairly broad range of electrical operating conditions, others, such as pacemakers, require precise voltage levels and voltage regulation for correct operation. Thus, certain classes of electronic devices powered by implantable energy sources will require careful attention not only to energy and power considerations, but also to voltage scaling and regulation. This requires appropriate interfacing between the energy harvesting device and the energy consuming microelectronic device. The talk focuses on the problems in the present technology as well as offers their potential solutions. Lastly, perspectives and future applications of the implanted biofuel cells will be also discussed. The considered examples include a pacemaker and a wireless signal transfer system powered by implantable biofuel cell extracting electrical energy from biological sources. The design of implanted biofuel cells operating in vivo promises for future various medical electronic implants powered by implanted biofuel cells and resulting in bionic human- machine hybrids. Aside from biomedical applications, one can foresee bioelectronic self-powered “cyborgs” based on various animals which can operate autonomously using power from biological sources and used for environmental monitoring, homeland security and military applications. In all bioelectronic systems, regardless their applications and complexity, the power sources will be highly important, and implanted biofuel cell are promising devices for providing electrical power extracted from the internal physiological resources. 

ElectroChemistry 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yong Lei photo
Biography:

Yong Lei is a Chair Professor at the Technical University of Ilmenau in Germany. His current research interests focuses on template-based nanostructuring, energy-related devices (sodium-ion battery, supercapacitors and PEC cells) and optoelectronic applications of functional nanostructures and surface nano-patterns. So far he has authored 131 papers in SCI-indexed journals and 2 patents, many of them are published in first-class scientific journals, such as Nature Nanotechnology, Nature Communications, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Angewandte Chemie, Advanced Materials, Advanced Functional Materials, ACS Nano, Advanced Energy Materials, Energy & Environmental Science, Chemical Society Reviews, Progress in Materials Science, Nano Energy. Prof. Lei also received a few prestigious large projects in Europe and Germany, including ERC (European Research Council) Starting Grant and ERC Proof of Concept Grant, BMBF (Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany) and DFG (German Research Foundation).

Abstract:

Functional nanostructures have drawn intensive attention with the development of miniaturization of modern and future devices. Realization of such nanostructures presents an important task for nanotechnology research and device applications. To address this challenge, template-based method provides a perfect approach owing to the geometrical characteristics of the templates. We have developed template-based nanostructuring techniques using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanopore arrays and polystyrene spheres with scalable, parallel and fast processes.[1] Employing these techniques, three-dimensional and surface nanostructures have been fabricated. The obtained nanostructures possess large-scale arrayed configuration, high structural density, perfect regularity and cost-effectiveness, and are highly desirable for constructing energy conversion and storage devices, including solar water splitting,[2-6] supercapacitors[7-9] and rechargeable sodium-ion batteries.[10-13] The device performances demonstrated that the obtained nanostructures benefit these applications through the precise control over the structural features enabled by the geometrical characteristics of the templates.[14,15] These achievements indicate the high potential and importance of template-based nanostructuring techniques for both basic research and device applications. Especially, we proposed recently a multiple nanostructuring concept using a binary-pore AAO template,[16] indicating a new perspective of template-based nanostructuring for device functionalization.

  • Advances in Electrochemistry | Theoretical and Computational Electrochemistry | Electroanalytical Chemistry | Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage | Bioelectrochemistry | Electrochemical surface science | Batteries and energy sources
Location: Berlin, Germany
Speaker
Biography:

Rolando Guidelli obtained his degree in Chemistry at Florence University, Italy, and was appointed by Florence University as a lecturer in Electrochemistry. He was then promoted to full professor of Electrochemistry at the age of 32 years in the Faculty of Science of Florence University. His scientific interests have been focused on electrode kinetics, structure of metal/water interfaces, and bioelectrochemistry. He has won several distinguished prizes in the field of electrochemistry and has published more than 230 papers in reputed journals and several book chapters. Furthermore, he has served as the organizer of several conferences in the field. 

Abstract:

The most direct method for verifying the functional activity of channel-forming peptides and proteins consists in monitoring the flow of physiologically relevant inorganic ions, such as Na+, K+ and Cl, along the ion channels. Measurements of average and single channel currents across bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) interposed between two aqueous solutions are extensively employed to this end. A major drawback of BLMs is their fragility, high sensitivity toward vibrations and mechanical shocks, and low resistance to electric fields. To overcome this problem, metal-supported tethered BLMs (tBLMs) have been devised, where the BLM is anchored to the metal via a hydrophilic spacer that replaces the water phase on the metal side. However, only mercury-supported tBLMs can measure and regulate the flow of the above inorganic ions, thanks to mercury liquid state and high hydrogen overpotential. Thus, they react to the presence of proteins, charges and physical forces in a dynamic and responsive manner, by reorganizing upon interaction with external perturbations and mimicking the functionality of living cell membranes. The potential of Hg-supported tBLMs is illustrated by the use of different electrochemical techniques. Moreover, a tBLM formed on a mercury cap electrodeposited on a platinum microdisk yields a micro tBLM that maintains the same fluidity and lipid lateral mobility as on a hanging mercury drop and allows the recording of single channel currents and of two-photon fluorescence lifetime images of lipid rafts and gel-phase microdomains, opening the way to its use in high throughput screening applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Grzegorz Milczarek received his PhD and D.Sc. degree from Faculty of Chemical Technology at Poznan University of Technology (Poznan, Poland). Currently hi is a Professor at the same university. He is also a head of the Division of General and Analytical Chemistry. His research areas  include: electrocatalysis, preparation of new materials for energy conversion and storage, preparation of chemically modified electrodes to be used as electrochemical sensors. He has published over 50 peer reviewed publications.

Abstract:

Lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth, present in all woods and grasses. In its native form, it is insoluble in any solvent and therefore useless for solution chemistry, in spite of its documented antioxidant properties. On the other hand, chemical derivatives of lignin (technical lignins) are produced in the quantities of millions tons per annum as a by-product in the production of cellulose from wood or other plant materials. Depending on the technology used, technical lignins differ in molecular weight, chemical composition and the structure of chemical moieties that make them soluble in organic solvent or even in water. Of particular interest are lignosulfonates that exhibit both poly-electrolyte and poly-phenol character due to the presence of ionisable and hydrophilic sulfonic moieties and substituted phenol groups responsible for their reducing properties. In this report, we demonstrate that technical lignosulfonates can be used as both reducing and stabilizing agents for cost-effective synthesis of various nanoparticles including noble metal nanoparticles and transition metal hexacyanoferrates that show valuable multifunctional electrochemical properties. The obtained hybrid materials show multiple redox activity due to the presence of lignin-derived quinones. Therefore, such materials can be used as energy storing materials or sensing platforms for electrochemical sensors (see for example Fig. 1). Lignosulfonates and lignosulfonate-stabilized nanoparticles can be also introduced into chemically or electrochemically polymerized conducting polymers e.g. polyaniline, poly-pyrrole and poly-ethylenedioxythiophene. 

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. K. Boniface Kokoh is developing electrocatalytic materials for sustainable energy conversion and storage. He manages an electrocatalysis group that prepares electrode nanomaterials that are suitable to each application. His research topics concern hydrogen production in a solid polymer electrolyte water electrolyzer, abiotic electrodes design for hybrid biofuel cells and the CO2 electroreduction to platform molecules.

Abstract:

Statement Glucose is an environmentally friendly and sustainable carbohydrate that is actually a cyclized aldehyde in aqueous solution i.e. a hemiacetal. Its selective oxidation by the anomeric carbon in C1-position without any function protection is of great interest for cogeneration because the electrochemical process enables converting this highly functionalized organic molecule into electricity, heat and added-value chemicals. For this objective, we decide to synthesize effective nanomaterials towards glucose conversion at the anode and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathodic side of a fuel cell. The physical characterizations of the prepared materials and their electrochemical analysis at each half-cell, permitted to optimize the activity of the electrodes according to their elemental composition and structure. Furthermore, a constructed direct glucose fuel cell (DGFC) delivered an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V in 0.5 mol L-1 NaOH and an outstanding output power of 2 mW cm-2. Complementary analytical techniques were employed to quantify the reaction processes involved in each compartment, determine the reaction products resulted from the glucose transformation and thereby, to understand reaction mechanisms of the glucose oxidation and the ORR over the synthesized electrode materials used in alkaline medium. As results, the identification of gluconate as the sole reaction product in the anodic side showed a selective 2-electron conversion of glucose, while the ORR proceeded through a 4-electron pathway over the designed cathode catalyst

Speaker
Biography:

Shozo Yanagida is an emeritus professor of Osaka University and a research director of “Research Association for Technological Innovation of Organic Photovoltaics” (RATO) of University of Tokyo.  Since he was promoted to a professor of newly established  “Koza” (research course) of Graduate School of Engineering in Osaka University (1980), he had contributed to photochemical conversion of solar energy, e.g., excellent photocatalyses of both nano-sized (quantized) ZnS and poly- & oligo-paraphenylene.  When he was staying at SERI (now ENREL) as a visiting professor of Dr. A. Nozik’s group in 1984, he understood that organic molecules and their aggregates are kinds of quantum dots themselves.  He has his expertise in evaluation of dye-sensitized solar cells, i.e., molecular structured photovoltaics, and passion in improving photo-conversion efficiency and long-term durability of solar cells in view of unidirectional electron flow and electron lifetime in solar cell devices.

Abstract:

So-called perovskite solar cells (PSC) are composed of PbI64- (MeNH3+)4 salt, where PbI64- plays an essential role as an effective solar light sensitizer with keeping semiconducting property even when aligned each other. Density-functional-theory-based molecular modeling (DFT/MM) using reported X-ray crystallographic structure of PbI64-/MeNH3+/H2O salt (named FOLLIB in Cambridge Structural Data) validates that the packing unit consisting of {(PbI64-)9[(MeNH3+)2-H2O]2(MeNH3+-H2O)2(MeNH3+)2}28-  should show  UV/Vis absorption spectrum at lmax=424 nm (pale yellow color) as observed for the PbI64- crystal.  DFT/MM of the FOLLIB horizontal aligned component, [(PbI6 4-[(MeNH3+)2-H2O]2(MeNH3+-H2O)2(MeNH3+)2/(PbI6 4-)2)4- verifies that the component has narrow energy gap of 0.3eV, predicting excellent semiconducting property of the PbI64- alignment with MeNH3+.  Three H2O-free PbI64-/MeNH3+ aligned components, PbI64-(MeNH3+)4, [PbI64-(CH3NH3+)3]- and [PbI64-(CH3NH3+)2]2- are molecular modeled and verified to have UV/Vis spectra at lmax=570nm, lmax762nm, and lmax=945nm, respectively.  Mixtures of them will be colored black, which is consistent with observable black coloration of PbI64- alignments with MeNH3+ in amorphous solute state. It is further verified that PbI64- undergoes van der Waals and Coulomb interactions both with electron accepting layers, i.e., nc-TiO2 in PSC of nc-TiO2/MeNH3PbI3/spiro-OMeTAD and with electron donating layer, i.e., spiro-OMeTAD in the PSC.  The molecular orbital structure and electrostatic potential map verifies formation of tight interaction between them.   The electron density-based alignment PbI64- validates unidirectional electron transport at both interfaces, resulting in high open-circuited voltage (Voc) of ~1.0 eV in PSC.  In addition, the semi-conducting sensitizing layer of PbI64-/MeNH3+ components validates excellent short-circuited photocurrent (Jsc), and respectable fill factor of PSC.   The PbI64--aligned solar cell will be regarded as a kind of quantum dot solar cell 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Amedeo Capobianco earned his PhD in 2008 at University of Salerno, where he now works as an assistant professor. His current research interests include the theoretical treatment of charge transport phenomena in biochemical systems and in organic materials.

Abstract:

Singly ionized DNA exhibits long range hole transport (HT) covering distances up to 200 Å [1]. Hole transport has great biochemical and technological relevance, as it controls the site distribution of the oxidative damage in DNA and makes DNA a potential conduit for nanoelectronics, used both as template and as active component. Different mechanisms for the hole transport have been invoked so far: ion gated transport, thermal activated hopping, and superexchange among others. Independent of the kinetic mechanism, the of hole transfer in oxidized DNA is modulated by the complex mosaic of low-lying electronic states, whose accessibility depends on the effective in-situ hole energies of nucleobases and the electronic couplings between interacting nucleobases.The hole energies for adenine (A) and guanine sites were previously quantified by using voltammetry, the influence of hydrogen bonds on the oxidation potential was also determined. Information for cytosine oxidation was inferred by spectroelectrochemistry experiments.Here we have focused our attention on electronic coupling parameters. The latter have been estimated by the lowering of the oxidation potential observed for DNA oligonucleotides containing an increasing number of stacked homo-purine nucleobases. Voltammetric data were interpreted in terms of the two state model. Experimental  results were further confirmed by theoretical computations carried out at the full quantum level for single and double stranded oligonucleotides including sugar-phosphate backbone and solvation.The observed lowering of the oxidation potential for single stranded oligonucleotides containing an increasing number of adjacent adenines amounts to ca 0.3 V for the AA step, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. That result suggests that adenine tracts give rise to delocalized hole domains (Figure 1), greatly facilitating hole transport in DNA . Although stacking interactions are found to be less effective in stabilizing the positive charge on adjacent guanines inside a strand, our results confirm that guanine tracts constitute a very efficient trap for the hole . 

Speaker
Biography:

Ingo Krossing studied chemistry in Munich (LMU) and finished his Ph.D. thesis 1997 (with Prof. H. Nöth). From 1997 to 1999, he worked as Feodor Lynen postdoc with Prof. J. Passmore at UNB, Canada. In 1999, he started his independent career as a Liebig- and DFG-Heisenberg-Fellow at the Universität Karlsruhe (TH) (mentor: Prof. H. Schnöckel). 2004 he changed as assistant professor to the Ecole Polytechnic Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), before being appointed Chair of Inorganic Chemistry at the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg in 2006. His research interests cover ionic systems from reactive cations to ionic liquids, as well as electrochemical energy storage. With an ongoing ERC Advanced Grant he develops absolute acidity and reducity scales.

Abstract:

The comparison of acid-base and redox chemistry in their acidity (=> protonation) and reducity (=> electronation) scales is currently limited to measurements within one homogenous medium / solvent. Yet, it is crucial being able to measure chemical potentials of the proton and electron over medium boundaries to overcome this limit. Thermodynamically, the chemical potential differences of proton and electron are straightforward to describe, given the unified reference states ideal proton gas (1 bar) and electron gas (1 bar) we suggested in 2010 (proton gas)[1] and 2014 (electron gas).[2] This unifying concept was developed as part of our in March 2017 ceasing ERC UniChem project. The Protoelectric Potential Map PPM: In analogy to the proto- and electrochemical window of one medium like water, the PPM is a 2D plot of the medium independent pHabs vs. peabs values based on these unifying reference states. Any reaction with transfer of protons and / or electrons in any medium may be placed on the PPM. Given that the respective transfer energies are known , the thermodynamic relations between them may directly be compared over phase and medium boundaries.

This plot reveals at a glance the differences of reducity (i.e. electronation power, synonymous to redox potential) of a redox system (marked by colors) in dependence of the solvent S (marked by digits). For example, the Pearson soft deelectronator Ag+ (green) is up to about 3.5 V or 350 kJ mol–1 more effective in hard solvents like HF (2) or DCE (7) rather than in soft media like NH3 (3) or the Ionic Liquid (IL) HMIM Br (8). 

Speaker
Biography:

Milko van der Boom completed his B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and his M.Sc. degree in Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Amsterdam. In 1994, he enrolled as a doctoral student at the Weizmann Institute of Science, where he studied Organometallic Chemistry; he was awarded his Ph.D. degree with distinction in 1999. After three years of postdoctoral work at Northwestern University, where he studied the formation of functional organic films, he returned as a faculty member to the Weizmann Institute’s Department of Organic Chemistry. His interdisciplinary materials chemistry research focuses on metalloorganic-oriented synthetic and mechanistic studies. Prof. van der Boom's prizes and honors include an Alon Fellowship from the Israel Council for Higher Education, the Henri Gutwirth Prize from the Technion, and the Israel Chemistry Society's Prize for Excellent Young Chemists. He is the first incumbent of the Bruce A. Pearlman Professional Chair.

Abstract:

Directional electron-transfer events are the basis of many technologically important systems and biological processes. In this study, we demonstrate how the distance over which electron transfer occurs through organic materials can be controlled and extended. Coating of conductive surfaces with nanoscale layers of redox-active metal complexes allows the electrochemical addressing of additional but distant layers that are otherwise electrochemically silent. We also show that our composite materials can pass electrons selectively in directions that are determined by the positioning of redox-active metal complexes and the distances between them. These electron-transfer processes can be made dominantly uni- or bidirectional. Our design strategy involves 1) a set of isostructurally well-defined metal complexes with different electron affinities, 2) a scalable metal-organic spacer, and 3) a versatile assembly approach that allows systematic variation of material composition, structure, and electron transfer properties. We control the electrochemical communication between interfaces by the deposition sequence of the components and the length of the spacer, and therefore we are able to program the bulk properties of the assemblies.

Speaker
Biography:

Pascal Boulet has completed his PhD in 2001 from both the University of Lyon (France) the University of Geneva (Switzerland). He then moved to University College London (England) as a postdoctoral fellow for two years. Since 2003 he is associate professor at the Aix-Marseille University (France) where he works on materials for energy using computational chemistry tools. He has published over than 50 papers in reputed journals.  

Abstract:

The phenomenon of deposition of a monolayer amount of metal atoms onto a dissimilar, more noble metal electrode at a potential more anodic than expected from the Nernstian equilibrium potential was recognized about 70 years ago but it was not before 1974 that Kolb, Gerischer and Przasnyski explained theoretically this concept known as the underpotential deposition (UPD) DVupd. Using over 20 couples of metals these authors found that DVupd followed the simple, linear equation DVupd =½Df, where Df is the difference in work functions between the adsorbate and the substrate. For most of the metal couples investigated, the relation was verified. However, this seemingly oversimplified relation was soon after contradicted by Bewick and Thomas’ experiments on the deposition of Tl and Pb on Ag single crystal electrodes. Thenceforth, there has been tremendous works achieved by several authors to refine the microscopic understanding of the UPD process. These theoretical works were often accompanied by numerical simulation approaches at the atomistic level (Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo techniques) and quantum mechanical calculations. However, despite the increase of computer and softwares capabilities the models used in these studies cannot fully capture the whole complexity involved in the UPD process and simplified model systems had to be used. In this paper, we will review the microscopic theory of UPD and the results obtained from computational, atomistic approaches. We will show the assets but also the weaknesses, and the foreseeable improvements in particular in the realm of the density-functional theory.

Speaker
Biography:

Mitsuharu Tabuchi is an inorganic synthetic chemist using wet-chemical process for oxide-based positive electrode material of lithium-ion battery. His synthetic experiences above 15 years were constructed mainly to get homogeneous LiFeO2-Li2MnO3 solid solution. The constructed synthetic route is also effective for preparing LiNi1/2Mn1/2O2-Li2MnO3 one. He has also characterization experience using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray Rietveld analysis to know charge compensation mechanism for LiFeO2-Li2MnO3 system. He found also Fe and Ni substituted Li2MnO3 and it has high-potential for practical use, because it can be prepared largely by chemical company (Tanaka Chemical Corporation) and then is electrochemically tested by battery manufacturer (NEC Corporation) as power-source of electronic vehicle (EV).

Abstract:

Li-excess positive electrode material (LiMO2-Li2MnO3 solid solution, M=Ni1/2Mn1/2 or Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3) is a good candidate as its high-capacity (250 mAh/g) and acceptable discharge voltage above 3.5 V for high energy-density lithium-ion battery to EV and PHEV application. Especially LiNi1/2Mn1/2O2-Li2MnO3 solid solution (Li1+x(NiyMn1-y)1-xO2, 0<x<1/3, 0<y<0.5) is a most attractive as “Co-free” positive electrode material. Synthesis of this material is quite difficult, because homogeneously transition metal distributed precursor was hardly obtained. AIST has a solution using “co-precipitation – hydrothermal – calcination method”, which was found during to prepare a new 3 V-class positive electrode material, LiFeO2-Li2MnO3 solid solution [1]. In this work, the synthetic method applies to LiNi1/2Mn1/2O2-Li2MnO3 system [2]. As shown in Fig. 1, the homogeneous precursor can be prepared by low-temperature co-precipitation Ni-Mn hydroxide and hydrothermal treatment with an oxidizer, KClO3 and Li-source, LiOH.H2O at 220 °C. The precursor calcined with LiOH.H2O at 850 °C under N2 atmosphere to obtain better initial electrochemical performance. To improve cycle performance under full-cell configuration, Ti ion substituted for Mn ion by using 30% Ti(SO4)2 aq. solution. Although further effort to establish more facile synthetic method must be needed, the Ni- and Ti- substituted Li2MnO3 is an attractive candidate as high-capacity “Co-free” positive electrode material. We develop Li-excess LiNiO2 as high-capacity and better cyclability using thermal decomposition of Li2NiO3 [3]. AIST found a new 3.5 V-class Fe- and Ni substituted Li2MnO3 positive electrode material with NEC and Tanaka Chemical Co. [4, 5]. These materials are also “Co-free” ones.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ruiyong Chen received his Ph.D. degree (summa cum laude) in 2011 in physical chemistry from the Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany. He is currently a habilitation candidate at the Saarland University and a project leader at the KIST Europe. He has expertise in synthesis and characterization of electrode materials for energy storage systems and energy-efficient electrolysis. He has developed new two lithium intercalation cathode materials with disordered rock-salt structure for improving reversible capacity (up to 400 mAh g-1) for lithium ion batteries. He is currently developing new high voltage aqueous electrolytes for stationary energy storage using redox flow batteries.

Abstract:

Redox flow batteries are promising for large-scale energy storage applications due to their economy and scalability, in comparison with other energy storage systems. In addition, redox flow batteries have unique character of decoupled energy storage and power generation capability. Aqueous redox flow battery systems may offer safe operation, low cost and fast ionic mobility (power generation) in comparison with non-aqueous systems. However, due to the limits in the electrochemical stability window of water, aqueous systems can generally only be operated with low cell voltage (< 1.5 V). Conventional aqueous flow batteries have thus low energy density (< 30 Wh L-1), which is far below that for Li-ion batteries. Non-aqueous electrolytes using organic solvents, although can offer wide electrochemical window, suffer from low ionic conductivity, low solubility for active species and safety concerns. To access high cell voltage in aqueous systems, Chen et al., have recently developed new aqueous ionic liquid electrolytes with widened electrochemical window of about 3 V, using a concentrated aqueous solution of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMImCl). Herein, we explore various ionic liquid-based electrolytes and compatible redox couples (soluble species and semi-solid suspension utilizing solid-state cation/anion intercalation reactions) in the attempt to obtain redox flow batteries with high cell voltage and high energy density.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Teko W. Napporn is a Researcher of French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and also Adjunct professor at the Institute of Advanced Sciences of Yokohama National University. He is developing nanostructured electrocatalysts for energy conversion (Fuel cells) and storage (batteries and water electrolysis). His research topics deal with the surface structural effect in electrochemistry at electrified Solid-Liquid Interfaces, hybrid biofuel cells. He is also involved in the development of single chamber solid oxide fuel cell

Abstract:

Gold at nanoscale fascinated scientists who developed important research topics over physics, chemistry, medicine and biotechnology. The last three decades, various innovative investigations emerged for determining the role of size, the morphology on the unexpected properties observed for gold at nanoscale. In electrocatalysis, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were often used to understand the intrinsic relationship between their size, morphology and activity towards two main reactions: (i) the electrooxidation of organic molecules that have a great interest as fuel in fuel cell applications, and (ii) the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Electrocatalysis investigations on support-less gold nanorods have shown that it is a challenge to study the intrinsic properties of their surface through their interaction with a reactive molecule. Our recent results on gold nanospheres revealed that the size of these nanomaterials plays a key role in their electrochemical response. Therefore spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNSs) with a mean diameter from 4 to 15 nm were successfully synthesized. UV-visible spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, and Under-Potential Deposition of lead (UPD) were used for determining their morphology, size and approaching their surface crystallographic structure. UPD of lead reveals that their crystallographic facets are affected by their size and the growth process. In alkaline medium, the oxidation of glucose was used to evaluate their electroactivity. As results, small AuNSs exhibited drastic increase of catalytic activity (fig. 1). This feature might result in the high specific area and reactivity of the surface electron induced by their small size. The study of the reaction mechanism was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Gluconolactone and gluconate were identified respectively as the intermediate and the final reaction product of the glucose electrooxidation.